One For the Murphys

January 25, 2018 § 1 Comment


Late last fall, my 12 year old daughter casually mentions to me that the book One for the Murphys by Lynda Mullaly Hunt is one she would like to read. I make a mental note to myself that it would be a good Christmas gift for her (the kind of gift that is extra special because not only does she want the book, but because I listened and remembered, surprise!).  Later in the month, during our online Christmas shopping trip together over a Chai latte at our kitchen table, I say to my husband that we should order the book for her. He tells me that she already had a plan to submit the book request to her teacher. (Back story: each month my daughter’s Social Studies teacher invites her students to write a short essay on why they wish to own a particular book, what they hope to learn from it, and if the teacher is convinced, she will buy it for them.)  Back to my gift idea, I’m a little disappointed, but it’s a great way for her to get a book she likes, so I let it go.

Flash forward to January.  My daughter hasn’t gotten around to writing the essay to request the book. It’s a Thursday morning and I am volunteering at our school library processing the piles of returned books. I love this job, because it allows me to see what the most frequently read books are, noting that the ones that get “holds” put on them repeatedly must be real gems. As I’m scanning the bar codes to check each book back in, I suddenly discover One for the Murphys is in my hands. A wave of recollection washes over me and I smile at the synchronicity. My daughter was clearly meant to read this book, and I get excited once again at the prospect of being the one to give it to her. I set it aside to sign out and bring it home to my daughter later.

Before bed each night I have a routine: check the doors are locked, turn off the lights, clean up any straggling dishes or abandoned snacks, cycle the laundry I had forgotten I’d put in hours ago, and then, I check on my children. I collect the phones from the teenagers, place a silent kiss on each of my other two, tell Alexa she can stop spouting stories to my sleeping children, and then I head to bed.  On this night, as I stop in at my daughter’s room, she is reading One for the Murphys. “Oh!” I say delighted, “how is it?” She pulls her nose out of the book and responds emphatically “I loooove it”, her eyes growing bigger as she says loooove. “Oh terrific!” I say, as I listen to her go on for several minutes about what is happening in the book at that moment. My mind wanders a little as she is talking and I wonder to myself why she seems to always love stories about orphans. After she finishes and returns her nose to the book, I kiss her good night and take my leave, satisfied with a good result. But, as I was to learn,  there was so much more to this book coming into our home.

The next day, the book is laying on the part of the kitchen counter I refer to as “The Landing Area”, as it is where my paperwork and weekly tasks pile up. My daughter is making her lunch nearby and I say “you finished it already?” She turns to look at what I am referring to and when she sees the book, her face brightens and she says “oh yeah!, Mom, it was SO good! You should read it actually, I bet you’d like it”. Inside I was thinking of the five partially-read books currently piled on my night stand, as well as the many bought-but-not-yet-read books I have elsewhere in the house, and I think so myself, I don’t have time to read my kids books. But later that day when I saw the book  sitting on my “to-do” pile spot on the counter, I remembered a friend of mine commenting to me about how she really enjoyed reading the same books as her kids because it translated so nicely into great conversations about the story with them.  Alright, I said to myself, I’ll read it, then my daughter and I can have fun discussing it – always a great thing to stay connected with your tween, right? My intentions were purely focused on “what would a good parent do”.

Well, as I often say (and yes, I can hear my kids groaning in agreement), “What you focus on, expands”, and boy did it ever. My energy was on the choice to read a book because I thought it would make me a good parent to do so, and boy is that what expanded.

This book is about mothers. Bad ones, good ones, and a young girl my daughter’s age perceiving what makes a mom good or bad, through her young eyes. As I am reading, I am silently comparing my own parenting with what is happening in the book, wondering if my daughter did the same thing as she was reading it. On which end of the spectrum did my parenting land in her experience? As I finish the book a day later (cause I couldn’t put it down), I am in tears over the ending. My tears while prompted by what is happening in the story, have a much different feel to them. I’m not crying about the characters, I’m crying because I have suddenly experienced such clarity about the kind of mother I want to be in my children’s eyes. Not the eyes of other parents, or of my parents, or even my own perception, but the kind of mother I want my children to know me as. And suddenly any tension, anxiety, frustration and resentment I had hidden away in my body about my children’s behaviour and choices, is released. I remove my reading glasses because I cannot see anymore through the tears now flowing down my cheeks. I start laughing, partially because I’ve totally lost it over a book, but mostly cause I’m happy. Happy and so grateful for the clarity.

Like a refreshing splash of water on a hot day, my energy to parent my children is renewed, and I suddenly can’t wait for them to get home from school so I can love on them.

With gratitude.







The Lighthouse

October 3, 2017 § 1 Comment

Picture yourself standing on an inspirational cliff overlooking a beautifully deep blue ocean, taking in the vista as far as your eyes can see. The sun is setting and your mind can scarcely comprehend where all these amazing colours came from. Dozens of shades of pink, yellow and orange contrast with the dark blue hues of the stretching water. As the sun gets lower you begin to spot the silhouettes of small ships on the water. About a half dozen in number, they are making their way towards the shore.  As the sun’s light disappears below the horizon, the darkness brings with it a drop in temperature as the wind begins to pick up, and a sudden collection of dark clouds begins to shroud the surrounding landscape. You glance out to the ships, a sudden intuitive urgency welling up that they are in danger. There are six of them all in different areas, but each equally close to being tossed onto the rocks at the bottom of the cliff on which you are standing.  Your brain and logical mind begin to whirr, trying to problem solve your way to helping each of these ships in the darkness. There is no physical way you could jump to each ship and help them navigate their way to safety. You could get to one, possibly even two, but it would come at the sacrifice of not reaching the others. Recognizing your rising feeling of panic, you take a deep breath, welcoming in the clarity you need, and blowing out the panic that will not serve you in helping these ships.  As you take another deep breath, you feel your energy growing. Your own bright light expanding both outward and upward until you feel yourself tall and majestic on the solid shore, and as you stretch your arms out to each side and open your heart wide, a brightness emanates from you lighting up the rocky shore and all the surrounding water nearby. As you feel the energy effortlessly flow through you, you notice each of the ships correct their course and navigate safely around the rocks…………. You lower your arms and feel your feet solidly grounded in the earth. You feel strong but peaceful, a wave of gratitude flowing through you, knowing that by standing solidly grounded and shining your own light, you have allowed others to receive the clarity they needed to correct their own course.


 “As we let our own light shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same.”

                                                                                     -Marianne Williamson



With Gratitude for this Image Source:


An Examination.

January 31, 2017 § Leave a comment

Funny how some days can sneak up on you. Today for instance, I am missing home. I am missing home, but not just home – I am also yearning for special moments I once enjoyed.  I miss inviting a good friend over for tea and chatting while our children play, laughing at the mischief they create together, always with one eye watchful for potential toddler tumbles.  I miss spa pedicures and special dinners with my mom and sister, relaxing into the ease that family brings. I miss the house I rocked my babies in, and the beautiful views of sunrises it offers.

You wouldn’t think I would be missing home today, a rare sunny day during a Pacific NorthWest winter, but here I am. Alexa is playing the Lumineers and the song Nobody Knows comes on. It speaks of how hard it is to say goodbye, and how you don’t really realize how hard till you try. It speaks of journeys, and the road home, and how love keeps us going. It recommends to live the day doing what you can, ‘cause nobody knows how the story ends.

So here I am, writing, and doing what I can. I have interspersed my obligations of the day with tasks that bring me joy so as not to slip too deep into a sadness.  As I am watchful of my self-care today, in some funny way I begin to sense a heavy ribbon of gratitude woven through all that I feel.  I embrace the sweet memories created with loved ones in a place I call home, and I feel grateful for each beautiful experience. More than grateful, I feel enriched.

Each time I look at my teenage son, about to turn fourteen and already taller than me and wearing his Daddy’s shoes, even though he no longer says “Daddy”, I marvel at the light speed with which he has grown. My first born, I recall holding him in my arms and can even still remember his newborn smell. My eyes well up as I realize how far away those days are from where I stand now, and I pray the experience will be echo’d when I hold my future grandchildren one day.

With each wave of temptation to sink into what I am missing, I strive to see what is right in my world. A smile comes to my face as I recall with great clarity dreaming of this exact day. It was during a decade of pregnancies and nursing, up several times a night and rarely ever experiencing a moment to myself for all the demands of my young children. I remember imagining a day when my children would have more independence and not cling to me for every need. I emphatically wondered how far away that day was and how I would fare on the journey to get there.

I recall once, during my early high school years, one of my friends was unexpectedly scolded by her mother for repeatedly wishing for the coming weekend, barely able to contain her excitement about the planned activities. I found it remarkable that she would be scolded for such excitement until her mother explained that she was wishing her life away, and suggested she enjoy where she was at right now. Wise words commonly heard today, but not often heard in the early nineties.

As I close, I resolve to return to the present and embrace the gifts of the here and now. With a beautiful Namaste, I express my gratitude for the walk through cherished memories of my past and open my heart to how I want to feel today.



Mom Fatigue

May 6, 2016 § Leave a comment

If you are a mom, there is a good chance you have a very full definition of this term already in your head, and its resonance is why you are reading this now. It’s different for every mom, and as Mother’s Day approaches, I feel it deserves some real estate on my blog.  Also because my kids were complaining about having nothing to put in their lunch this morning and mismatched socks on their feet because I had no time for groceries or laundry this week. My response was less about empathy, and more about weariness.

I saw a Facebook post the other day outlining What Moms Really Want on Mother’s Day. It included:

  1. sleeping in
  2. silence
  3. to pee uninterrupted
  4. somebody else to cook
  5. a clean house.

I read that and heavily exhaled. Yes, so true. And then it hit me. Isn’t it crazy that none of those things involve celebrating our children or spouse? Enter Mom Fatigue.

We love our children. We love them so much we compete with every other mom in the PTSA to show what good moms we are. Some days I imagine we are all greyhounds, chasing that artificial hare speeding around the track, and I think to myself, who picked the hare, and how fast it goes?  Who decides that pace?

I see moms every day struggling with “not good enough” self-doubt, forever questioning how they could have done something better, been more organized, or how they missed a detail. Even on the good days, all it takes is one FB post or one Pinterest reference to send you into a tailspin of what you “should” be doing.

The word “should” just might be the most destructively–charged word in the English language.


I found reprieve this week in an exercise from Sanaya Roman’s book “Living With Joy”. In it, she offers:


“You may have been taught that being busy creates self-worth”.


(notice how there is no judgement in that statement? It just offers an idea for you to consider and decide if it aligns with your experience)

From this book, I learned to differentiate between Personality-driven activity (all the shoulds, and obligations we have created in our life) and Soul-driven activity – those activities done with your higher purpose in mind.

Weigh that for a minute in your mind, and as you do, gently walk yourself through your schedule today. For each activity, consider how it makes you feel and how it relates to your higher purpose? Keep in mind that your ego will try to step in and begin justifying your choices to help you feel better, but follow your intuition. Do you feel resistance and negative emotions in response to the activity, or do you feel excited about it, like it is aligned with your true nature?

And I hear what you are thinking…”Well that’s a neat exercise, but I can’t just drop my obligations cause they don’t feel good, I’ve made a commitment to them!” Right?

If you discover activity in your day that is creating resistance and negative emotion, it doesn’t mean you have to drop it. This new awareness is gifting you with choice. Perhaps the choice is to drop it, but more practically, maybe the choice is to shift your perception of it. Reach for a better feeling thought about the situation. Consider it from a different angle or perspective and see if there is a lens through which you can see the activity in a way that better aligns with your inner purpose.

For example, when I tried this for myself the other day, I lay in bed after hitting the snooze and walked myself through the planned activities of my upcoming day, applying the lens of Personality-driven vs Soul-driven. It was going very well at first, until I got snagged on washing the dishes (the ones I have left for several days). Hmm, I don’t love doing dishes and there is no way scraping day-old food off a frying pan is part of my higher purpose!  The job still needed to be done, and seeing how it’s unlikely I will get a butler for Mother’s day, I chose to look at it from another angle. How do I feel when the dishes are clean, put away and available to me when I wish to use them? Way better than I feel when I go to make dinner and can’t find a clean pan anywhere in the drawer. I reached for the better feeling thought – the one that fills me up when things are where they are supposed to be when I need them. I also love the way the kitchen looks when it is clean. It brings me joy to see a clean kitchen, and living with joy is most definitely part of my higher purpose.


“You may have many reasons why you cannot change your life right now. If you do not begin to create reasons why you can, change will always be a future thought, and you will not be on the path of joy”.

-Sanaya Roman


You have a choice to live joyfully*! Learn not to be trapped by your own creations. Everyone around you will thank you for it, and feel liberated to do the same!

Wishing you a joyful Mother’s Day!



*If you need a little nudge on how to live more joyfully, see below for an exercise from Sanaya Roman’s book, “Living With Joy”.

  1. List seven things that you love to do, that feel joyful when you do them, and that you haven’t done in the last several months. They may be anything – lying in the sun, taking a trip, getting a massage, accomplishing a goal, exercising, reading a book.
  2. Beside each of these seven things, list what stops you from doing it – something either inside (such as your feelings) or outside (someone or something, such as lack of money, that keeps you from it).
  3. Take two or three things on your list that hold the most joy for you, and think of one step you can take toward each to bring it into your life.
  4. Mark your calendar with a date and a time that you will bring each of these joyful activities into your life.

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